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View Full Version : Torn Labrum Repair - both shoulders



marco
22-09-2005, 04:27 PM
Just after some advice on shoulder surgery. I have been diagnosed with a torn labrum in both shoulders. It looks as though I will require arthroscopic surgery on both shoulders, left one first and then 6 months later the right one. I was given an estimate of about 5 weeks in a cast/sling and then up to 6 months rehab per shoulder. Is this accurate? What have other people been through?

If anyone can give me some idea of what it is like to go through this type of operation and how long it took to recover enough to get back to normal life. My main concern is firstly the pain, and secondly how long I will be off work. I work on a computer all day so it isn't physically strenuous.

Unregistered
10-11-2005, 12:07 PM
Just after some advice on shoulder surgery. I have been diagnosed with a torn labrum in both shoulders. It looks as though I will require arthroscopic surgery on both shoulders, left one first and then 6 months later the right one. I was given an estimate of about 5 weeks in a cast/sling and then up to 6 months rehab per shoulder. Is this accurate? What have other people been through?

If anyone can give me some idea of what it is like to go through this type of operation and how long it took to recover enough to get back to normal life. My main concern is firstly the pain, and secondly how long I will be off work. I work on a computer all day so it isn't physically strenuous.


Well, I have had my labrum repaired in both shoulders. It was very painful and lots of work. The labrum is connected to the bicep tendon, so after the surgery you are not allowed to lift anything "heavier than a plate" for a couple of weeks.

I was a different case than most because I have extremely loose joints. The doctors say I have the loosest joints they have ever seen. I have begun going to specialists because they are not healing properly, but don't worry about that. If you are not one of us weird extremely loose people, you should have a fairly simple recovery.

Good luck!

Unregistered
17-01-2006, 10:58 AM
I also have just been diagnosed with 2 torn Labrums.
My question for anyone out there that can help is will I ever bench press again.
What can I expect after the operation?
Also who is the best in Australia for the surgery. I ask this because many people seem to say that if you get the wrong surgeon you can have a slower recovery. In sympathy to all in my position or similar.
Thank you in advance.

Unregistered
24-01-2006, 10:57 PM
Hey there.......the best advice anyone can give/receive is to keep the mobility going prior to surgery. Theraband exercise and some strength training is the best way to manage the injury prior to surgery. The stronger the tendon/muscle group, the quicker the recovery. I recently tore three tendons in my right shoulder in a hockey game. Supra, Sub, and Labrum. Two are full thickness tears that have retracted. I have been told by 3 specialists, who 2 are family members, to strength train to my limit without full extension of these tendons. 2 weeks on im-mobility after surgery can takes its toll, and six weeks of sling.

Unregistered
09-02-2006, 01:16 PM
I had surgery on my right shoulder three weeks ago. I'm still in a sling (three weeks to go) and still get pain in my shoulder and in my back.

I know that I have 6 months of intensive physio to look forward to and hope to God that I'm up for it (I got sick to death of Physio exercises in the 18 monyhs prior to getting the surgery).

My advice for the period immediately following the surgery would be:
1. ensure they give you decent pain releif (I only got Panadeine and went back to the doc 3 days later to ask for panadeine forte - and got it) The shoulder is quite painful, but it is manageable.

2. The best advice I got was from one of the nurses - take the pain relief religiously (for me it was every 6 hours) even if you think you don't need it.

3. Have some loose t-shirts handy to wear after the surgery - you can't do anything with the arm afterwards. Loose t-shirts or button up shirts are easy to get on and off. If you're a guy you're lucky you don't have to deal with a bra as well. (I wear a loose singlet under button up blouse, colour coordinated of course :) and give the bra a miss completely)

4. Have at least 2 ice packs handy for the shoulder and use them whenever it gets a bit sore and have some heat packs to use on your back. This advice came from my physio. I was surprised how sore my back got and was in at physio 5 days after being back at work to get my back worked on (I was back at work 11 days after surgery). My back gets sore from sitting for long periods, standing up and lying down are fine, but sitting canes.

5. Be prepared to be really slow after the surgery.. Everything takes much much longer than you expect it to - even something as simple as going to the loo takes forever. I work at a computer most of the time and I take forever to type emails and documents, even searching for stuff on the web takes longer because I have to use the mouse with my left hand.

I don't regret having the surgery at all - I couldn't go on the way that I was. I wish I'd thought a little more about what life would be like following the surgery - I was just so releived that I could be fixed that I didn't put much thought into it. In 6 months it will all be over and I'll have an arm that works properly (touch wood), so it will be worth it :)

Good Luck
Jo

plucs
15-02-2006, 11:47 AM
My shoulder was reconstructed with an outer clavicle excision and modified weaver dunn with ligaments transferred from my humerous into a drill hole in the end of my clavicle.

I'd suggest the following to make life manageable during the post operative period:
* a boomerang pillow on top of several other stacked pillows and to rest your post operative arm on a pillow.
* get some anti-nausea medication from your GP if you are still suffering from the hospital medication. I had self-administered morhpine and general anaesthetic.
* I'd take more than 11 days off work. At 11 days I was still finding it difficult to get out of bed. I guess the rule of thumb would be to go back to work when you really feel up to it.
* Initially use ice packs on the arms but for no more than 15 minutes at a time and then reuse them at a minimum of 30 minutes later. Switch to heat packs after the ice packs become ineffective. For me this was about a week.

I have to agree on getting the surgery as soon as possible. Get your finances and commitments in order and do it. The worst thing I did was to avoid the surgery. See several orthopaedic surgeons as soon as possible.


I had surgery on my right shoulder three weeks ago. I'm still in a sling (three weeks to go) and still get pain in my shoulder and in my back.

I know that I have 6 months of intensive physio to look forward to and hope to God that I'm up for it (I got sick to death of Physio exercises in the 18 monyhs prior to getting the surgery).

My advice for the period immediately following the surgery would be:
1. ensure they give you decent pain releif (I only got Panadeine and went back to the doc 3 days later to ask for panadeine forte - and got it) The shoulder is quite painful, but it is manageable.

2. The best advice I got was from one of the nurses - take the pain relief religiously (for me it was every 6 hours) even if you think you don't need it.

3. Have some loose t-shirts handy to wear after the surgery - you can't do anything with the arm afterwards. Loose t-shirts or button up shirts are easy to get on and off. If you're a guy you're lucky you don't have to deal with a bra as well. (I wear a loose singlet under button up blouse, colour coordinated of course :) and give the bra a miss completely)

4. Have at least 2 ice packs handy for the shoulder and use them whenever it gets a bit sore and have some heat packs to use on your back. This advice came from my physio. I was surprised how sore my back got and was in at physio 5 days after being back at work to get my back worked on (I was back at work 11 days after surgery). My back gets sore from sitting for long periods, standing up and lying down are fine, but sitting canes.

5. Be prepared to be really slow after the surgery.. Everything takes much much longer than you expect it to - even something as simple as going to the loo takes forever. I work at a computer most of the time and I take forever to type emails and documents, even searching for stuff on the web takes longer because I have to use the mouse with my left hand.

I don't regret having the surgery at all - I couldn't go on the way that I was. I wish I'd thought a little more about what life would be like following the surgery - I was just so releived that I could be fixed that I didn't put much thought into it. In 6 months it will all be over and I'll have an arm that works properly (touch wood), so it will be worth it :)

Good Luck
Jo