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angieliu
20-02-2007, 02:38 PM
Hello everyone,

Just wondering if anyone knows with shoulder injuries what the likelihood of a frozen shoulder is if you have sustained injuries to the rotator cuff and shoulder joint? I'd be curious to know as I went to get a remedial massage today and it was mentioned to me that with some shoulder injuries especially where you shoulder muscles are over compensating to try to stabilise the shoulder that there is an increase likelihood of a frozen shoulder and that it is important to keep it mobilised.

I'd assumed that by doing internal/external rotator cuff exercises and shoulder stabilising exercises that this would prevent it.

A

kjwilkin
20-02-2007, 08:36 PM
Hello everyone,

Just wondering if anyone knows with shoulder injuries what the likelihood of a frozen shoulder is if you have sustained injuries to the rotator cuff and shoulder joint? I'd be curious to know as I went to get a remedial massage today and it was mentioned to me that with some shoulder injuries especially where you shoulder muscles are over compensating to try to stabilise the shoulder that there is an increase likelihood of a frozen shoulder and that it is important to keep it mobilised.

I'd assumed that by doing internal/external rotator cuff exercises and shoulder stabilising exercises that this would prevent it.

A

Hi Ang,

Not sure about the frozen shoulder thing.

I've developed a really tight capsule as a result of the instability I have in my shoulder.

Check with your physio when you see them next.

KJWILKIN

matt182
20-02-2007, 11:43 PM
im not sure if anyone exactly knows what cause frozen shoulder. Although injuries or pain, which causes the sufferer to limit the movement of the shoulder to bypass these primary concerns often lead to frozen shoulder, so dont start protecting your shoulder! :)

angieliu
21-02-2007, 08:18 AM
Hi Ang,

Not sure about the frozen shoulder thing.

I've developed a really tight capsule as a result of the instability I have in my shoulder.

Check with your physio when you see them next.

KJWILKIN


Hi KJ,

I have a very tight capsule too because of the instability but it sort of stumped me when the masseuss said that I had to be really careful with it all and to also put heat on my delts to ensure good blood flow.

I'm going to check with the physio when I see him next week.

A

angieliu
21-02-2007, 08:18 AM
Hi Ang,

Not sure about the frozen shoulder thing.

I've developed a really tight capsule as a result of the instability I have in my shoulder.

Check with your physio when you see them next.

KJWILKIN


Hi KJ,

I have a very tight capsule too because of the instability but it sort of stumped me when the masseuss said that I had to be really careful with it all and to also put heat on my delts to ensure good blood flow.

I'm going to check with the physio when I see him next week.

A

jellybean
21-02-2007, 09:20 PM
Hello everyone,

Just wondering if anyone knows with shoulder injuries what the likelihood of a frozen shoulder is if you have sustained injuries to the rotator cuff and shoulder joint? I'd be curious to know as I went to get a remedial massage today and it was mentioned to me that with some shoulder injuries especially where you shoulder muscles are over compensating to try to stabilise the shoulder that there is an increase likelihood of a frozen shoulder and that it is important to keep it mobilised.

I'd assumed that by doing internal/external rotator cuff exercises and shoulder stabilising exercises that this would prevent it.

A


Hi Ange,

Matt?s right, the jury is still out on what causes a frozen shoulder. However, although anyone can get one, research stat?s suggest they?re most likely in:
- women (70% of people who get them are women)
- people aged between 40 and 70 years old (apparently more common in the older end of this bracket)
- people with certain health conditions (hormonal or metabolic disturbances or other systemic diseases) or, as Matt says, injuries or pain which causes the sufferer to limit the movement of the shoulder

A person who meets all of those criteria is apparently most at risk. [I met all three criteria - only just on the age one (that'll teach me for telling friends that "40 is the new 30", ever since I uttered those fateful words my body has adopted a different agenda!!?]

While it?s something to be aware of, given the injury history you?ve reported here (an injury you?ve had for some time) and I?m guessing you?re a fair bit less than 40, I?d be surprised if you developed one as a result of the injury you currently have (and with the physio you have easy access to, I think it is even less likely!! With H's mobilisation and deep post cuff massage skills you couldn't be in better hands!)

Cheers,

JB

angieliu
22-02-2007, 02:48 PM
Hey JB,

Thanks for the infor about the causes of a frozen shoulder and I don't think that I fit into the criteria for it really. I just thought it was a strange comment for someone to say that. Oh well and I agree with H's magic work what more could you ask for.

Although I have noticed one thing though. I was seeing him on a weekly basis for treatment and we started to scale things back, I even moved from a green theraband to blue because my shoulder is getting stronger but since then in the last week, my shoulder clunks way too often than it should. It's very strange. It must have something to do with the massage he does to keep the muslces in the right place or something like that. Anyways so I'll see him next week to try and sort it out.

Hope your shoulder and knee are doing ok.

A