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azza2233
16-03-2007, 10:08 AM
Hi All,

First time poster, long time reader (always wanted to say that :) )

anywayz, Ive had 5 dislocations in the last 7 years so thought it high time to have the surgery done so I can surf and snowboard again without fear of it popping out.

Ive booked my surgery with Dr Goldberg after reading alot of good reports about him.

Im not concered overly about the actual surgery, more the pain and discomfort associated with it afterwards. Has anyone got any tips to help with sleep? I'll take the drugs for pain but sleeping im told is a hard thing to do after surgery, even with the tablets.

Another thing I want to ask, im scrawny as :D not much meat on the bones at all, im planning on doing some weight training ect for the next 8 weeks before the op to try and put some muscle on it, would this help at all or am i wasting my time?

Cheers,

Az

kerimo
16-03-2007, 01:18 PM
Hello Az,

I have had 7 dislocations in the past 3 years so I am pretty much on the same boat with you. I booked my surgery with Dr. Bokor for mid-april for an arthoscopic labrum repair. I must say I am very anxious about the actual operation maybe because I have never been thru anything serious before.

So basically on top of that concern I share the same questions that you have with the pain management, sleep and the overall rehab period. Dr. Bokor told me that I wont be able to drivea manual car for 5 months. So I take it I will have some loong days ahead of me.

Good luck to you and let us know how you after the operation.

kerim

hopeful
16-03-2007, 03:54 PM
Here are some of my ideas for you:

* Look into getting some home help (the hospital or such should be able to point you in the right direction for this or look them up in the phone book or the net etc) Home help is like a house keeper for those with disabilities or recovering from surgery (it is called Home Help here in OZ)…

* Cooking meals (you can look into something like Meals on wheels for the first month at least. Or try cooking things before hand that can be frozen and reheated (try to make a few months worth if possible), or organise family or friends to cook for you while recovering (or have the local take away/ out menus handy)...

* You need to get a list of people who are willing to ferry you around (or look at one of the volunteer driver services to get you to and from PT and doctors and such)...

* Shopping and the like (try doing it over the Internet (we have Woolworth's and Coles online here (2 large supermarket chains)...

* Try buying your kids and hubby's presents and things before the surgery (if they have birthdays or events during your recovery period as shopping for gifts can be VERY hard when non-weight bearing. Also if you have kids it may be worth buying in a few gifts for any birthday parties that may come up while in your recovery phase (you can always use them for your own kids or other birthdays etc if they are not needed but trying to run out and grab a gift at the last minute can be very hard (if you have the time and money) so that you have them on hand. Or look into online stores for gift buying but remember that they may not be as cheap and that you have to allow for the time it takes for postage etc...

* A trolley on wheels can also be a help as you can push etc, this way you can carry food, laundry etc etc from one place to another (i.e. a pot of water or a filled kettle from sink to stove top or power point)…

* SIT AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE (this saves the OTHER knee)...

*A Chair in the shower or a board over the bath with a hand shower for the tap can make it easier (especially if you can’t take your sling/ brace off)...

*Make EVERY plan you can in advance…

* Organise friend to come and visit (if you are stuck at home) and also things like to help keep you busy while you are laid up (make sure they are things that can be done one handed etc)…

* Find out from your doctor if you will qualify and if you can get yourself a disabled parking permit (for the year at least but you will probably need it for 2 (as you will then have PT etc)). Walking may be difficult…

* Think ahead to what it is like in winter there (will you need warm gloves for you hand(s)? or will you need a jumper/ coat that will do up over your sling/ cast/brace etc)…

* The laundry (ours is in the house and NOT the basement like in the US (we don't even HAVE a basement), if your laundry is in the basement you might want to organise to have someone else do your laundry (a friend or relative or if you can afford it and don't have anyone handy you could send it out or hire someone to do it for you (think reliable high school or college kid who might enjoy the extra pocket money)...

* Arrange the house NOW to make getting around easier and teach the kids AND hubby NEVER to leave anything lying around on the floor (to prevent falls). If you have pets you might want to try teaching them not to jump up on you and to move out of your road (a command for this can be taught quite easily and relatively fast if needed, otherwise have the pets in a separate part of the house until you are sitting down as you do NOT want to trip over them and injure yourself etc...

* Find out if you can call in prescriptions to the chemist, and have them deliver it to you…

* Find out what services are available in your area for the disabled or temporary disabled. (Ask the hospitals and search the phone book and the internet) and then contact them in advance and see what they can do to make things easier…

* Find out if your hospital has an equipment loan service (or if they know of one in your area) to make life easier (they can supply bath boards and shower chairs etc and the like for minimal or NO cost)…

* You also will need a satchel or messenger bag etc for hands free carrying (of anything and everything from a book/pen or paper to mobile/cell phone or cordless phone or even snacks or ANYTHING)…

* A mobile/cell phone and cordless phone for emergencies and to make it so that you DON'T need to try to get to the phone in a hurry (a cell phone for when out and a cordless for at home) and also try a carry pouch for them…

* THINK easy and light and convenient when doing or buying anything from food to backpacks to socks…

* Pillows to protect and cushion your shoulder and arm etc…

* DON'T forget a computer/Laptop and your internet connection etc…

* A good supply of garbage bags and tape (or those special cast cover bags) for showering post-op or while in cast/ brace) as you may not be allowed to take your brace off while showering (especially if you have stitches etc in)...This wont work if having shoulder surgery, if you are having shoulder surgery you might want to look into getting a second sling so that you can change into this other sling and shower etc in it (that way you won’t have to wear a wet sling about (as it can take quite a while to dry with body heat etc and it may cause a rash etc where it is stuck against your skin (especially between your arm and body etc)…

* Dycem Matting is very handy (Dycem matting is a non-slip matting that makes life easier, it can prevent your dinner from running away while trying to eat one handed, your dinner/ drink etc from slipping over or around while carrying it on a tray, and can be cut into strips and wound around cutlery making it easier to grasp and stop it slipping out of your hands (especially if using your non-dominant hand)…

* If you have a pet then look into having someone walk and groom them for you etc…

* Bed Wedge Pillow (as you may not find it comfortable to lie flat after surgery and sitting up in a chair or sitting up (at least partially) in bed may make it more comfortable to support your shoulder)…

* Dry Shampoo (also called waterless shampoo or no-rinse shampoo) this is great if you can’t wash your hair as much as you would like. This will help keep your hair clean, without the hassle of having to shower… Alternately you could organise someone to help you with this (I have paid hairdressers to help me wash my hair (it was about $5 au per visit), or a friend etc can help you do this at the sink or over the bath (you may also want to look at protecting you sling/ brace etc from getting wet etc)…

* Pillow for your car (as a passenger etc you may want/ need something to help support your shoulder)…

* If it is your dominant arm that is involved you might want to practice writing with your non-dominant hand, so that you can write at least a little…

* Highlighters - I know this sounds odd but I love to do word search puzzles etc and my dominant arm is my injured arm, instead of having to try to circle the words that I find with my non-dominant arm, so instead I simply highlight the word (that way you can still see what the words/ letters are etc and it is easier to hold and use than a pen/ pencil)…

* Visit your local Independent Living Centre (or other such facility), or look online for products that could make you life much easier (look at items for single handed use or arthritis etc)…

Items like:
- Lap/ Bed Tray so that you can eat from bed or a lounge chair as a chair with arms may be more comfortable for you that a dining chair as it can help support your arm etc better…

- Hand exercise putty etc as you really need to exercise your hand and wrist while your shoulder etc is immobilised…

- Long Handled sponges and brushes to make bathing easier (as this will help you reach those places you wouldn’t be able to otherwise with only one arm (especially if you are unable to use your dominant hand)…

- Zipper pulls (you could also try using key rings (the metal round rings you use to keep keys etc together) just threat these onto your zip pulls or just thread a piece of ribbon etc through the hole in the zip pull and pull the zip up) or you could buy a zipper aid…

- Button aid (this is a device that allows you to do up buttons without assistance and one handed), or you could sew in press studs or Velcro so that you don’t have to do buttons up etc…

- Elastic shoelaces (or elastic cord) – This makes it possible to put on your shoes without having to do up your shoelaces (which is very difficult one handed), I have simply laced elastic cord through my shoelace “holes” and then tie them (I actually put them in backwards so that they can be tied at the bottom (closest to your toes), I not it so that it can’t come undone easily and then can wear my lace up shoes as slip on shoes. Also shoes with 1 piece tongues are easier (like some triathletes wear)…

- Book Holder

- Spreadboard – This is a plastic board with a lip on it to go over the edge of the bench and has 2 lips to hold a piece of bread etc in place, so that you can butter it etc…

- Multi-purpose cutting board – This is a board that has 2 “lips” to hold bread etc so that it can be buttered etc and has a couple (3) spikes (nails nailed in from the other side) so that you can “spike” potatoes etc onto them to make peeling & cutting possible one handed (this is much more convenient etc than the spread board etc on its own as it incorporates more than one option)…

- Knork – this is a knife and fork in one, as cutting your own food can be very difficult, with only one hand, especially if you have to use your non-dominant hand)…

- Beliclamp – this is a device for holding jars and things still so that you can open them one handed. It has a lip that slips over the edge of a bench etc and a v shaped “lip” that holds a jar etc in place and a t shaped bar that you push in with your hip against the jar etc to hold it…

hopeful
16-03-2007, 03:54 PM
- Baby Boa-Constrictor – This is a small multi-purpose strap wrench, that is adjustable and can be used to open jars and lids and things (this is the best jar/ bottle/ lid opener I have EVER found as it opens lids of many many sizes (from bottle lids on coke etc bottle to jars etc. you can also use it to open taps and things…

- Head Lamp – This is much better than a torch etc as you don’t need a free hand to use it, it is great for reading in bed, navigating places at night etc etc…

- Hands-Free phone headset –

- Headset/ Microphone for computer/ laptop…

- Dictation software for computer/ laptop – this is so that you can “type” hands free…

- Food Processor – so that you can chop, grate, mix, blend etc foods with one hand…

- Pot Holder – this is a device (usually magnetic) that attaches to your stove top and holds the handle of your pot still so you can stir it one handed…

- Boob Tubes/ Bandeau’s etc – these are a great bra option if your shoulder etc is too tender to wear a standard bra. If you do need to wear a bra try something with wide, soft straps (like a sports bra or crop top)…

- Electric Can Opener – Much easier than trying to hold a can and use a manual opener at the same time (either that or only buy cans with the ring pulls on them)…

- Larger sized zip up tops etc – large enough to fit you with your arm/ sling/ brace underneath and easy to get on and off by yourself…

- Loose Fitting pull up pants – at least for the first few days/ weeks (easier that trying to zip/ button pants)…

kjwilkin
17-03-2007, 09:14 AM
Hi All,

First time poster, long time reader (always wanted to say that :) )

anywayz, Ive had 5 dislocations in the last 7 years so thought it high time to have the surgery done so I can surf and snowboard again without fear of it popping out.

Ive booked my surgery with Dr Goldberg after reading alot of good reports about him.

Im not concered overly about the actual surgery, more the pain and discomfort associated with it afterwards. Has anyone got any tips to help with sleep? I'll take the drugs for pain but sleeping im told is a hard thing to do after surgery, even with the tablets.

Another thing I want to ask, im scrawny as :D not much meat on the bones at all, im planning on doing some weight training ect for the next 8 weeks before the op to try and put some muscle on it, would this help at all or am i wasting my time?

Cheers,

Az

Hi there,

I think you've done the right thing to get it fixed.

About 4 years ago I had a shoulder reco after having a traumatic dislocation and experiencing recurrent dislocations/subluxations. I don't regret it one bit. It's so good now. The first 48 hours after the operation are the worst. Make sure you keep the pain medication up because if you leave it till the pain gets too bad it is much harder to control. After that it gets better each day. Having the arm in a sling helps a lot with the pain.

I am now waiting to see my shoulder surgeon, Greg Hoy in just over 2 weeks to see whether I'm going to have surgery on the other shoulder for multi-directional instability. Just hope I can get it fixed as I've been in a lot of pain.

Your idea of building up some muscle is a great idea. I'd speak to your specialist to see what physio he recommends. Make sure they are someone that specialises in shoulders. Greg Hoy is really strong on doing pre-hab before a shoulder operation. That's why I'm doing a bit more conservative treatment to see if that helps.

I hope this helps. Good luck with your op and recovery !!

azza2233
24-05-2007, 06:25 PM
can anyone tell me if my arm after the op is going to be a standard sling (ie across my chest) or if im going to have wear the full on one where my arn is placed at my side?

Cheers,

Azza

kjwilkin
24-05-2007, 07:50 PM
Hi there,

It really depends on your surgeon and what they find during the operation.

I have just had shoulder stabilisation surgery and been put in a standard sling for 4 weeks.

Good luck with it.

azza2233
25-05-2007, 01:45 PM
thanks mate, im hoping its a standard one.

How are you doing after yours? Open or Keyhole?

kjwilkin
26-05-2007, 11:48 AM
Hi Azza,

I'm doing well, thanks.

I had an open capsular shift and also had to close off the rotator interval as my shoulder was incredibly loose.

Good luck with it all. Would be keen to hear how you get on.

nicko88
01-06-2007, 09:00 PM
hey everyone
i am a 18 year old who used to play footy but due to dislocations it has caused me to quit.
just browsing through google found this website i have found it very helpful,over the past 3 years i have dislocated my shoulder at least 20 plus times due to contact sports and doing normal stuff swimming and sleeping, just a couple days ago i had shoulder reconstruction on my left shoulder after a couple years waiting i was happy to get it done,when i got in there they inserted a block into my neck which will numb the pain for at least 18 hours i suggest if they ask you if you want it take it, i got taken in there at 10am and they finished up at 12 noon lunch time ,after surgery you then will be in recovery room where you will be somewhat hungry after the surgery well i was to say the least i was very hungry i was slept off the pain because all the drugs they gave me,at 5pm i was taken to a ward with other patients who have had surgery,the surgery was a success,i was really worried about the pain after the surgery it takes at least 48 hours till it drops a bit and doesnt get too chronic i am taking some panadol tablets which i insert into water and they disolve works really good,sleeping has been a pickle but after a couple days u get used to positions while sleeping.for anyone going to get shoulder surgery or reco good luck it is painful for the first 48 hours the pain will start dramatically decreasing down

Levi
15-06-2007, 05:07 PM
I had a reco of my "good" shoulder two years ago.Apparantly it was quite complex.It was done under GA. I was given regular pain medication by injection for four days post op and then capsules which I used for a couple of weeks.I had a rather unusual sling as well.It was a black suede sort of one with a big box like support underneath and it came around the back as well.It all ended well.