Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hamstring Avulsion (complete tear from pelvis)

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Carol, The tumor is in the front, almost opposite the tear so I'm not sure they could do both. I have an appt. on Mon. in Tampa, 2 hours from me here in Fort Myers, FL. Yes, I would love some help finding a surgeon! Very nice of you to offer. I have hopes the surgeon I see on Monday will have some suggestions as well. You and your Husband remind me of my Wife and I and sound like a lot of fun to be around. We have young kids so we aren't as social, but we're just as active! Living life should be a passion. I'm not sure who wrote this but it pretty much sums up my view on life: My life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather I will skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming...
    WOW...WHAT A RIDE!!

    Comment


    • I want to share couple of things that I learned that have helped me tremendously post surgery. 2 weeks before surgery, when I made dinner I made 3 times as much, and portioned out the extra food into containers to freeze. It wasn' t that much extra work because I was cooking anyway. This way I'm guaranteed there is healthy food to eat, and that my busy guys aren't just going out for fast food all of the time. It has been great. Not only has it helped my family in taking care of me, now that my husband is at work, and my son at school, I am more independent, and can microwave my lunch. I made smaller portions for me, to help from gaining weight since I am so inactive. Lentil stew is great for filling you up for a long time, with a small amount. I have also found a couple bites of whole grain oatmeal will stave off hunger til the next meal. I have to watch it, cause I can fall into a pattern of eating because I am depressed about having to lie around. I am so pleased with cooking and freezing ahead, that I'm going to start doing this all of the time. There are plenty of nights I don't want to cook, but I don't want to have to eat junk either.
      The other thing I discovered is that night shirts, post op are the simplist things to wear. I can put them on myself, and it makes going to the bathroom SO much easier. I can't dress myself below, and I like being independent. Now that I am 1 week post op, I've switched to skirts and tops. I feel like I'm getting better faster when I'm dressed, and lying on top of the bed instead of in it. Probably a little crazy, but whatever helps the psyche at this point, is good. I can' t imagine trying to wear pants. the brace I have is huge and metal. Even Ginormous sweat pants would be hard to get over it. If I wore sweat pants under oit, my husband would have to take my brace off, dress me, put my brace on, and then I would have to try to pull my pants down far enough to go to the bathroom. Sounds awful. I'll stick with skirts, no undies. Much easier access. Sorry guys. You could wear kilts, or night shirts. Gotta go for simplicity for the most independence. My doctor did give me a funny look when I told him, unless you have a better idea on how I can dress myself, I'm just wearing skirts no undies for awhile. I mean, seriously, I don't want to have to be dressed. He said me no, I don't have a better idea. You are stuck in how much you can do for yourself right now. Something you can't avoid for awhile anyway. Carol

      Comment


      • I want to share couple of things that I learned that have helped me tremendously post surgery. 2 weeks before surgery, when I made dinner I made 3 times as much, and portioned out the extra food into containers to freeze. It wasn' t that much extra work because I was cooking anyway. This way I'm guaranteed there is healthy food to eat, and that my busy guys aren't just going out for fast food all of the time. It has been great. Not only has it helped my family in taking care of me, now that my husband is at work, and my son at school, I am more independent, and can microwave my lunch. I made smaller portions for me, to help from gaining weight since I am so inactive. Lentil stew is great for filling you up for a long time, with a small amount. I have also found a couple bites of whole grain oatmeal will stave off hunger til the next meal. I have to watch it, cause I can fall into a pattern of eating because I am depressed about having to lie around. I am so pleased with cooking and freezing ahead, that I'm going to start doing this all of the time. There are plenty of nights I don't want to cook, but I don't want to have to eat junk either.
        The other thing I discovered is that night shirts, post op are the simplist things to wear. I can put them on myself, and it makes going to the bathroom SO much easier. I can't dress myself below, and I like being independent. Now that I am 1 week post op, I've switched to skirts and tops. I feel like I'm getting better faster when I'm dressed, and lying on top of the bed instead of in it. Probably a little crazy, but whatever helps the psyche at this point, is good. I can' t imagine trying to wear pants. the brace I have is huge and metal. Even Ginormous sweat pants would be hard to get over it. If I wore sweat pants under oit, my husband would have to take my brace off, dress me, put my brace on, and then I would have to try to pull my pants down far enough to go to the bathroom. Sounds awful. I'll stick with skirts, no undies. Much easier access. Sorry guys. You could wear kilts, or night shirts. Gotta go for simplicity for the most independence. My doctor did give me a funny look when I told him, unless you have a better idea on how I can dress myself, I'm just wearing skirts no undies for awhile. I mean, seriously, I don't want to have to be dressed. He said me no, I don't have a better idea. You are stuck in how much you can do for yourself right now. Something you can't avoid for awhile anyway. Carol

        Comment


        • The other thing I love using post op is my polar insulated, bicycle water bottle. It holds 24 oz. stays cool, and has a loop on the cap so that I can loop it on my fingers, and still use my crutches. I drink a lot of water, so this makes it easy for me to refill.

          Comment


          • Dave T, I love that quote too. I feel the same way. You might want to look into Doctors Hospital in Sarasota. I was looking at orthopaedic surgery ratings , and they are listed in the top 5% of the nation, and #1 in Florida, supposedly. Of course, I always have to investigate what I find on the internet. Just because they have a high rating, doesn't mean that the surgeon with the most experience with hamstring avulsions will be there. But their high rating, may bring in more patients, thus increasing the number of rare surgeries. My brother told me to ask how many of these surgeries had they performed, and what were the outcomes of the surgeries. If can ask your internist or reg doctor if they know any of the drs.or administrators in Sarasota, and or Tampa. Sometimes some of the doctors went to medical school together, and the can tell you who the best surgeons are. That's what my brother did for me. He called an administrator here, that he knew from med school, and asked who the best was. If your doctor doesn't know anyone in theses areas, I wouldn't hesitate to call the hospital administrator of the hospital, and ask. It's a rare injury, so it is more difficult to figure out. My father was a hospital administrator, and he would have pointed someone in the right direction. They know their surgeons very well.

            Comment


            • Dave T, It looks like Tampa has excellent Orthopaedic surgeons. I bet you will find a surgeon there that you trust. If it were me, I would probably ask who has done the most of these surgeries. That's always hard to say to surgeons themselves, because surgeons usually have pretty big egos. It might be easier to ask who they would choose to be their 2nd surgeon, and why. In my case, the second surgeon actually had more experience, but I felt comfortable with that because if there were complications, I knew he would step in. The young surgeon was an up and coming hot shot who prides himself in doing excellent work. Although most of the surgeons have personalities that I wouln't be able to get along with, that's what makes them good surgeons. I can't stand tthe neurosurgeon that did my back surgery, but he is an amazing surgeon!

              Comment


              • O.K. I had to reinvent underwear, because it was driving me nuts not wearing any. I just cut open the side that my injured leg is on. It easily slips on my good leg, and then I duct tape the other side. I thought about velcro, but i think duct tape is more comfortable. Duct tape! The solution for almost everything!! Ha ha

                Comment


                • I am kind of concerned. My leg has been more swollen for about 30 hours. I keep icing it and taking ibuprophen. It hurts more, which I think is due to the swelling. Tomorrow a.m. i will call the dr. unless it gets worse in the middle of the night. The leg feels warmer than my good one. My foot is swollen and red too. I took some hydrocodone, i had been taking just advil for pain, but i need to sleep. Carol

                  Comment


                  • Hi Carol, how are you doing this a.m.? How is the swelling? You sounded pretty uncomfortable. It's amazing to me you are just taking advil for pain! Ah yes, duct tape. The essential tool in any toolbox and now for Post-op fashion Paints an interesting picture in my head! A person does what they have to...... adapt and overcome.
                    Thank you for the suggestions concerning surgeons. It doesn't surprise me that Sarasota is high on the list. There is a large amount of retirees in this area. Hips, knees and shoulders are the money makers here. When I had my knee worked on 3 years ago, they had patients lined up like an assembly line.
                    If the surgeon I see on Monday is not experienced with this, my question to him will be,"Who would you have perform the surgery if you had the same injury?" This place is located on the University of South Florida campus so I would think there would be some options.
                    Thanks again for the suggestions and I hope you have a better day. Hang in there!
                    Dave

                    Comment


                    • Dave, The University sounds like the right place to be. The Orthopaedic surgeons there are rated high. I really hate pain killers, so I rarely take them. Usually the first four days, and then switch to advil. I hate the grogy, really down feeling I get taking painkillers. I'd rather experience a little more pain, than feel so depressed. At least taking advil, I can read, and keep my mind busy. Sometimes I have to take pain medicine at night to sleep. The pain with this surgery really isn't that bad. The extra swelling makes it feel worse. I went through back surgery about 18 years ago. That was bad. My L5 had shattered, and pieces embedded in the nerve. I lost feeling from the waist down, and had emergency surgery. It was another rare thing that hardly ever happens, but that's the story of my life. Lol. Nothing they gave me touched the pain. I was in pain for 2 and a half years. It took that long for the nerves to heal. I learned to dissociate from the pain to keep from going crazy.

                      I am going to see the Dr. today, hopefully, (still awaiting their return phone call. I just want to make sure that I don't havr an infection, or boold clot or something. It 's most likely nothing. Carol

                      Comment


                      • I feel SO much better! Dr.gave me permission to remove the leg brace part of the time w I am lying down. Hydrocodone+taking off leg brace= relief. Ahh....The brace makes my leg swell so this is new found relief. : )

                        Comment


                        • I am new to this forum. I must say it is very helpful! Two and one half weeks ago had a fall the first morning out while vacationing in Cabo San Lucas. Excruciating pain, plus first experience in a Mexican ER. Had to wait a week before flying home. Complete tear of all 3 tendons at ischium tub... Saw orthopedist at Kaiser who did an MRI and gave me the option for surgery. A 64 yrs he said I would be the oldest one he has ever done the surgery on. I have a kaiser PPO plan so I can use a surgeon out of Kaiser and will be seeing one on Monday to check him out. My Kaiser doc wants to do surgery this week, but I have not had surgery with Kaiser so am a bit scared. Question now is how do you get home from the hospital in your car, in your house, and up the stairs?

                          Comment


                          • Hi All

                            I am here to join this very unfortunate club. I have been reading all the posts on here for a few months now and gleening all I can from your experience.

                            My name is Tania and I live in the UK. I had a waterskiing injury last April where I did the splits (on an internet date!!!) that is another story. But it has taken me until very recently to even get an MRI scan on the NHS system here. Finally I have managed to see one of the only surgepons in the country who knows about this type of injury and it has been diagnosed as a chronic avulsion of two of the three hamstrings on my left leg.

                            I am a very keen alpine skier (working as a ski guide), runner, cyclist, yoga enthusiast etc - generally very active and this has without a doubt been the most depressing thing I have ever had to deal with in my life (perhaps that makes me lucky!). I think I definitely made my injury worse last year as I did not know what was wrong and it was constantly diagnosed by doctors and surgeons as only a mid muscle tear, which led to me over doing the gym and yoga to then be in a whole world of pain.

                            I am booked for the op on 22 May - but I am just so p'ed off at the wait as it will be over a year by then.

                            I have some questions for you seasoned avulsion injury club members:

                            Is there anyone on here who has had to wait this long who has now had sufficient time to see the results of the op? I know there are a few who had just had the op and were worried they had not made the right decision.

                            I am definitely getting the op as my current condition is totally unacceptable to live with. I have some pins and needles in the back of my leg and sit bones, and there seems to be alot of strain on the adductor (inner thigh muscle).

                            My surgeon has said an 85% success rate - I am so worried that I will be the unlucky 15%. Has anyone on here had it fail and did you get it re-operated on?

                            A more stupid question - has anyone alpine skied with this injury pre-op? I know it sounds silly but I am just so depressed I thought at least if I could ski just on the easy runs it might cheer me up - of course though I am worried about making it worse. The sugeon has said it cannot be made worse as it has completely unattached and moved away from the bone. He was not worried about me skiing on it. He said that I could leave it how it is and live with it - not an option in my books, but does this mean that you can go about your normal life to the extent it will allow?

                            I have seen a physio and am having exercises to improve it before the op.

                            My other question is would it make that much difference to just pay to get it done privately now and not wait another 3+ months, or has it been left so long it will make little difference. I just want to get on with my life it is driving me crazy - and everyone around me!

                            Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated, I will no doubt be glued to this once I have had the op and cannot do anything for 2 months!

                            Tania

                            Comment


                            • Hi Tania, if you noticed no one has been in this forum for awhile. I myself joined today after much reading all the info. I cannot give input to your problem since my surgery in coming soon. What I can do is give a little support to your depression and anxiety. I know how scary and frustrating this is for you, since I am sharing the same experience but at a much older age. You are so young, athletic and energetic so you will come through it all fine. I have learned from the forum that surgical treatment has not been around that long on this, and medicine advances at amazing paces. So the delay in surgery you have experienced may ultimately be resolved in the future. Ah, if I ony had your youth I would be more optimistic about myself. My own doc says he has never done this procedure on anyone so old. Hello age discrimination.

                              I don't think I would do anything to risk further injury if I were you. Just hang in there and be resiliant. Athletes always do better in surgeries, so don't get down.

                              Comment


                              • Hi Mobley

                                Thank you for your reply and yes the depression and total shock that something this serious has happened to me it really half the battle. I am only just getting my family to realise how serious this is and that I have not spent the year whinging about nothing! Unforunately I am not feeling very athletic at the moment - the gym and exercise get pretty boring when you are constantly worried about making it worse.

                                Poor you too - at your age !!! In this country they would not even consider doing the op on someone over a certain age as the NHS would consider it a waste of money - it is totally outrageous if you are fit and active, but unfortunately that is what you get when you have a state run health system. They weigh your level of need up - the first surgeon I saw looked at me for 5 mins - asked if it was affecting my job, then told me my leg will never be the same again I need to accept this and go back to physio and get on with my moderated life. I think he knew it was something more serious but he did not warrant me as important enough to even get an MRI scan - I was furious! I am currently pursuing a legal negligence case against the NHS for how I have been treated. Luckily I did not drop it and have chased down the best surgeon in the country for sports tendon injuries and he took one look and is going to operate - just the waiting list unfortunately. Our private health care is not nearly as good as yours either since it is not competitive as most people go with the state run variety so there is not so much funding. I now have private but of course too late for this incident - will probably never need it again (with luck)!

                                Has anyone on here heard of Professor Maffulli? He is operating. He is known as Mr Tendon in the UK apparently! I have researched him and it looks like he is the guy researching stem cell therapy in this country - if the op does not work I am going to offer to be his guinea pig!

                                A friends Dad has avulsed both right and left legs hamstrings about 10 years ago and is in constant pain from it having never had the op - even just sleeping at night, so you are definitely doing the right thing. Of course having done all three I am sure it is not even a consideration to leave it. My whole leg is out of kilter with 2 gone, and I have had problems with the glutes and calf muscles as they have been over compensating. It is like running with a flat tyre exactly as someone else described - I can jog for about 5 mins then the strain of lifting it just wears me out and it goes flat to the floor. I see people out runnnig and it makes me want to cry.

                                Thanks for your support. Let me know how the op goes. I have read somewhere that if it is all three it is more obvious to surgically repair and I would have thought it would be a clean break and perhaps easier to repair. Keep positive and good luck - at least you are in the right country for medical care - it is far superior to ours in the UK.

                                Tania

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X