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  1. #2291
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    Des Moines, Iowa
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    I hope everyone keeps posting. It helps a lot to hear how you are all doing. Even as we move forward, there will be temporary set backs. It is encouraging to hear when someone is doing well or has an inspiration. It is also helpful to relate to the difficult times, because, as we know, unless you've experienced this, it is hard to truly understand.

  2. #2292
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    Feb 2012
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    Hi everybody,
    retrospectively I wished I had found this forum pre and post operatively last year (2011). Tania (alpine bunny) gave me the heads up and I am impressed about the similarity/s world wide (relatively anyway) re treatment (or lack thereof).
    It's a hard road for sure but there is no way to circumvent the process as I am reminded by the posts of others.
    March 2011 I avulsed proximal attachments doing the "splits" whilst surfing. Initially misdiagnosed (as a "strain") until an ultrasound and then MRI confirmed same. Had surgery around 2 weeks later. There was little available pre and post op education provided and much of what followed was customized based on protocols I found through various medical journals.
    That said, the initial expected outcomes were less than positive (you'll have to give up this sport and that sport etc etc) although the Surgeon at a post op assessments stated that you can do most things within 10 - 12 months.
    He was right. Back to work after 4 months (I am a Registered Nurse). Skiing at 6 months post op. Surfing at 10 months post op. Performance about 90% pre injury.
    Surgery was essential for any optimal functional outcome and I am grateful to the Surgeon getting on with it before our equivalent of Workers Compensation (ACC here in New Zealand) had a chance to quibble about the costs. I would have paid somehow anyway given that surgery was the best (and only) way forward for me.
    Not everyone will have the best outcome/s even with surgery but you will never know unless you go.
    Life does get better (would not have believed it at the time of injury).
    Mick Fanning (WCT surfer and two time world champ) had this injury in 2004. 6 months post repair and rehab he won a major contest and still then went on win the aforementioned world titles. There is hope.
    Thanks for sharing and, whatever you do, keep going. There is plenty of ignorance out there so I would say stick to this forum for the " good oil ".
    Darren
    Last edited by dome; 12-03-2012 at 08:13 AM. Reason: spelling sucked

  3. #2293

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    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for the info Mobley, I hadn't thought much about the negatives of walking at this point. Still using 1 crutch. No one- physio, or gp doctor have told me to do or not to do any exercises or actions. Except to say don't do anything that hurts. My gp doctor thought that bc I can stand on my toes or heels that I'm basically ok. My physiotherapist (15 years exp.) has never seen this injury. That said, I jinxed myself today. Took my dog for a walk and had an attack of sciatica that thank god,only lasted about 2 hours and then gradually faded away after I got off my feet. I am on extra pain meds, my doctor is good about that. I have fibromyalgia too, and am used to chronic pain. It is important to have adequate pain meds. I have an 11cm retraction, I'm not sure it can go any farther!:
    later,

  4. #2294
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    Jan 2012
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    Australia
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    Not sure if I've already posted this, but I had my final surgeon's visit last month, 5 months to the day after surgery. He tested how it worked and basically said keep doing what you're doing, don't do any running or jumping yet, and don't come back*. My physio had given him a detailed report and the surgeon was satisfied with the pace of things. They are both pretty cautious.

    I went privately for the whole thing (in Australia) because waiting would not have given me the best chance at the best outcome. I guess it's cost me near on $30K in medical costs and lost wages (even with medicare covering parts of it), but that's just how it goes.

    I wasn't ready for going back to (office) work for 3 months, and then it was christmas :-) but I've been working pretty much full time since early January with no problem. I've been needing to stand up less frequently recently but figure it's probably good for me to take breaks anyway, not sit down all day.

    Before surgery it had stopped hurting, except when I sat on it, massive bruising much!, and I got very tired standing all day as well as commuting, so I'd basically stopped working a week after the injury (i had surgery 3 weeks after doing it). Mine was totally off and 10cm+ retracted, so I could walk ok, just a bit limpy, and with no power.

    I can do most things, am just a bit inflexible so shoelaces and boots on my bad leg are still a struggle, but the physio says it will come as I work it more. Climbing stairs is no problem. Using my bad leg to eg raise myself off the floor, or step onto a chair is not on though!

    Using a motor scooter (Piaggio Fly 150, very cool) has allowed me to be more mobile than I otherwise would have been, get to rehab more easily etc., and stopped me from walking too much; i spent two days at the start of Feb walking around the city for work and that plus being without the scooter during that time actually set me back by a week or so. I have no problems commuting or going on long rides and have been fine with that since the start of January (3.5 months post-op).

    This week I'm going to get back on the recumbent trike, I probably could have a couple of weeks ago but have been too busy and to be honest after the walking thing I've been a little more cautious.

    Part of the slowness has been building up the other muscles, particularly my glutes, which tend towards tightness and soreness at their attachments and in deep. I had massive wastage. Now that they are mostly working a bit better, we're working on the hamstring strength itself since it's being properly supported.

    I guess you just have to explore what you can and can't do at the stage I'm at, but just take it easy and listen to your body, don't take anything for granted.

    *Of course if anything happens I can call him, and he said as much, but he wasn't expecting me to.
    Last edited by flerdle; 12-03-2012 at 09:47 PM. Reason: spelling and grammar :-)

  5. #2295
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    Feb 2012
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    Guildford, UK
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    Hi all and welcome Willow, Goal Tender and Dome - glad to see you on here!

    Dome - Isn't it fascinating reading? Just so great to be able to chat to others who have been through the same. Glad to hear you are doing well. You were the first person I chatted to about this and were a great help, I really appreciated all your advice. Such a shame you didn't find this when you initially had your injury.

    Mobley good to hear you are doing OK - its really tough being on your back. I have had a tough two weeks, although my parents have done a brilliant job of making it more bearable. Lying flat is just so bad for you - every time I stood up I felt sick and faint and thought I was going to black out a couple of times which would have obviously been disastrous. I have quite low blood pressure normally so guess this made it worse. I have serious muscle wastage - I had thin legs anyway and now they are just ridiculous - and my arms too from lying down doing nothing for so long!

    Update - I saw the surgeon for my first post surgery appointment yesterday 14 days after surgery. I have had my leg in a straight brace for the two weeks and have been horizontal near on all day every day except the odd foray to the bathroom. Just for anyone new reading this - I was initally misdiagnosed for about 8 months then was diagnosed by Professor Maffulli in London as having 2 tendons avulsed but when my surgeon went in he discovered I had snapped just one but in the muscle section of the hamstring not the tendon. i asked him yesterday what I should tell my Dr for my medical records and he said it was still considered as an avulsion but had separated in the muscle section as opposed to the tendon or from the bone. Anyway I feel very lucky that he could repair it as had previously been told that muscle to muscle repair was like sewing a chicken wing back together and was impossible. I was told by my surgeon that this was good news as my healing would be quicker because muscle repairs faster than tendon plus only being one.

    Willow - I have had my injury since last April - it was 10 months pretty much to the day when I had the surgery. Mine started off not to bad but then I realised I just couldn't run, and then after 6 months it just started getting worse and worse with constant sciatic pain and loss of control of my leg. It got to a point where I just knew I had to get something done - and it turned out I only had one missing hamstring - I would say definitely get the surgery do not waste time. I had massive amounts of scar tissue that had to be removed and the repercussion on my other muscles was dreadful, I ripped my calf muscle and gluteous medious and was in constant pain, just not knowing what was wrong. I kept blaming myself for things I had done in the gym, but as my surgeon said this was always going to happen from this type of injury as it is like a puppet string being cut. My surgeon was amazing - I was told by another that it was impossible to do anything to fix my leg and other doctors have also said the same. Get it fixed before there are more reasons for them not to do it! I am furious with our state medical care in the UK for misdiagnosing me and quite obviously cost saving to the detriment of my health, they would not give me an MRI no matter how much I pleaded till I got myself referred to a sports injury clinic in London - Barts Sports and Exercise Centre for anyone in the UK who needs to know. And I was fortunate to have my appointment arranged with the Professor who is the President of the British Orthapaedic Sports Trauma Association and is an examiner for the Royal College of Surgeons. He always brings a number of students with him!

    Back to my appointment yesterday - My parents went into the hospital and asked where I could wait since like you Carol there was no way I could sit and cannot stand for long without fainting or possibly throwing up as it makes me feel sick!! They let me go straight into a consultation room and lie down, luckily the bed was low - poor you Mobley - the most terrifying thing is re-injuring it. I have spent the last 2 weeks terrified that even the way I was lying in bed was doing damage. I had this weird thing where because my leg was straight it would slide down the bed all the time and put strain on the repair so I was constantly having to pull my leg back up the bed. I tried lying on all different layers and duvets and it still did it. By last Saturday I was convinced I had pulled the repair apart and spent most of the day crying in bed just so depressed at what would be the next stage.

    The Pofessor had the dressings removed form my leg, felt quite firmly along my leg then said right get up and walk across the room! It was amazing - full weight, only problem my knee was locked straight but gradually released. He has given my some exercises to do on the hour every hour 10 for each basically leg curls, lifting my leg in front bent and straight and sife pendulum swinging. He even said I could sit on the back seat of the car on the way home ( although I didn't as was too scared!). Once I got home I was walking albeit not very fluidly without crutches. Its a miracle!! I no longer have dressings on it, but cannot shower for 2 more weeks as he does not want me to get the wounds wet. I have to spend the next two weeks learing to walk normally again. I did not have physio as he said it was pointless and to just do his exercises. He is a god!! He said I need to do my exercises 10,000 times! So i get the impression I can't overdo them, although I am going to be careful. My leg is rock hard all down the back - he wanted me to feel where the lump of muscle has gone and is now straight up the back of my leg again - I could have cried with joy.

    All I can say is if anyone has this injury in the UK - see him, he is the best. It cost 5000 to get it fixed privately with no insurance, which would have been the same even if I had had the tendon graft - so really not that bad considering the benefit.

    Sorry this is so long!

    Mobley - keep me updated as to how you are doing. I hope you are OK. It will be worth it in the end.

    Best wishes to all

    Tania

  6. #2296
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    Feb 2012
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    Thousand oaks, Ca
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    Hi all...day 13 post surgery. Just laying here dealing with the ups and downs I know you all have. With the weekend had lots of visits from friends and family. Nice but found it exhausting. It is amazing, no let's call it shocking, how easily you wear out. And not just physically. Yesterday was another boo-hoo day...you just get so fed up with laying around, wobbling on crutches, and the different aches and pains, and the length of this journey at times is overwhelming. Thanks Flerdle and Rich for continually sharing your jouneys months into it. It gives us hope that we will get there.

    Tania, I am so happy you are up! But please be careful. Muscles and tendons take a long time to heal fully. I have found surgeons basically interested in doing the surgery and little interest in care in pre and post surgery...surgery is all they are intersted in. Notice how they only call you once after surgery? If I were you I would call a few physical therapists and get their opinion if PT is needed, and if they have ever treated your surgery. It is not just your hamstring that was affected, but your whole body that may need help...changes in performance of other muscles, circulation, heart, blood pressure, and stamina.

    I am currently researching and finding physical therapy protocols for my surgery so I can better discuss my planned treatment when I meet my physical therapist. I know PT is the key. Hang in there fellow hammies, your posts...big ones, little ones, elated ones, bitchy ones, informative ones...all help us get through the day!
    ...Mobley

  7. #2297
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    Feb 2012
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    Guildford, UK
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    Hi Mobley

    Thanks for your concern, sorry that wasn't clear - my surgeon only meant no pt for the next 2 weeks as its too early. He only wants me doing his exercises until the next time I see him in 2 more weeks, then I will be having a pt session straight after his appointment with the hospital physio that he works with. I am planning on staying with that physio for as long as it takes to feel fully mobile and strong then perhaps move to the one I found near me that deals with the waterski team. The surgeon is actually very interested and involved, I emailed him earlier about diet and supplements and he answered almost straight away, very friendly and upbeat.

    I am being careful. My biggest problem seems to be my lock knee, every time I sit down or lie down for longer than 10 mins it gets stuck and feels quite scary to move as it feels like something might snap.

    Mobley - which posts are bitchy!!?? I am wondering now how things come across! It is certainly a long journey, but I am sure we will all soon forget once we are better. It has made me more sympathetic to others suffering and also grateful for my mobility when I have it fully back, perhaps that is a good thing to learn from this.

    TX

  8. #2298
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    Feb 2012
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    Thousand oaks, Ca
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    No posts are bitchy here. I guess that is a California term for talking about things that aren't so happy. Sorry

  9. #2299
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    Feb 2012
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    Guildford, UK
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    Ha ha - lost in translation! I had forgotten that was the meaning over there. Where are you in California? My job prior to this and my imminent job change was flight attendant for British Airways. I was in LA last month on Long Beach. I love the healthy active lifestyle over there and the sushi!

    T

  10. #2300
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    Feb 2012
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    Wisconsin
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    Hi,

    3 weeks post-op today! Yes, I went back to work. I sat most of the day in my comfy office chair, working on computer, but around 2:00 I could feel my let getting pretty uncomfortable, so I layer on a couch with a laptop. I was totally uncomfortable sitting on my big old incision, could feel it the whole time.

    I am having headaches everyday, but like Mobley said-maybe these are from poor circulation???

    I am having a problem for the past 1 1/2 weeks with my big toe on my bad leg, it started out itching, and then got really painful, and now it looks like it was burned. I am thinking gout starting? I did finally call the clinic(only because my husband made me) and talked to a nurse. It is from poor circulation, No wonder, my brace is at 90 degree angle. He said to keep it elevated as much as possible and to pinch the toenail to see if the pink comes back after 5-7 seconds, if it does that is good.

    It is pretty uncomfortable at night, along with the brace, I'm not sleeping much. I refuse to take another pain pill though.

    Sometimes I swear I just want to rip this brace off, one more week till I get it to 45 degree which should help circulation, and I might get to have toe bearing weight. I get to start PT too in one week.

    Sorry, I'm frustrated and so sick of the brace and crutches!!

    Maggie

 

 

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