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  1. #2551

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenner View Post
    Hi Everyone,
    I thought this was "rare", but reading this thread, I guess not so much. I'm scheduled for surgery next week. It will be 6 weeks post injury. Sitting has been uncomfortable, but it sounds like it will get worse. Just wondering how long people had to stay out of work. I have mainly a desk job.
    thanks
    I think it really depends on your job and your doctor. My doctor assumed around 4 weeks I was back to work, but also didn't want me driving (? I know). I went back to work at 5 weeks, which was good and bad: I was entirely sick of sitting on the couch, but driving, sitting, and dual crutching around was pretty difficult for me at that point. I had been very compliant and wasn't doing much of anything at 4 weeks. Out to dinner every now and then, but that was about it. No shopping/errands, etc.

    I have been on restricted duty, e.g. 4 hours at work, 4 hours at home, which has been very nice. I get to the point of not being able to bear sitting anymore and then it's almost time to head home to work from the couch.

    I'm nearing the end of week 7 and still really uncomfortable sitting in a chair. Walking around a bunch tires my leg out. But, things are improving slowly.

    FWIW, I also only had the horizontal gluteal fold incision (no vertical incision down the leg).

  2. #2552
    Senior Member
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    Sep 2012
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    Thanks, I guess I was being overly optimistic that I wouldn't need that much time off.
    I think I will also have the horizontal incision. I have two tendons that are completely avulsed-4 cm receded & also a waterskiing injury. I am looking forward to getting back to running, biking, triathlon...but I know that will be awhile. It's nice to see that people are talking about getting back on the bike.

  3. #2553

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenner View Post
    Thanks, I guess I was being overly optimistic that I wouldn't need that much time off.
    I think I will also have the horizontal incision. I have two tendons that are completely avulsed-4 cm receded & also a waterskiing injury. I am looking forward to getting back to running, biking, triathlon...but I know that will be awhile. It's nice to see that people are talking about getting back on the bike.
    It really varies for everyone. I'm still reading through a lot of posts here, but there was someone that was working PT about a week or 2 after surgery. It probably depends on if you stop taking the pain meds soon enough feeling good and how active you and your doctor are okay with? I took it *really* easy. I didn't even go to PT at all until week 6. I feel like I made good strides after that. Maybe I took it too easy, but I feel confident that I let my body heal well.

    For me, and this varies from person to person, sitting is just excruciating still. I actually was massaging the incision last night after a shower and could feel the anchors in there, so I know what's causing the discomfort. Just going to take time I guess.

    I tried riding my own bike (got the ok yesterday) in front of my garage and... my sitbones just aren't ready for it unfortunately.

  4. #2554
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    Sep 2012
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    Well at least you got the ok for the bike. Although, at about 8 weeks, sitting is still uncomfortable? That is discouraging! Will the anchors dissolve? It doesn't seem like they would.
    I'm guessing that taking it easy is probably the best route to a full recovery.
    I think I further injured myself this weekend. I missed a stairstep and landed on my bad leg. Now I have a sharp pain with sitting. I really just want to get this surgery over with.

  5. #2555

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenner View Post
    Well at least you got the ok for the bike. Although, at about 8 weeks, sitting is still uncomfortable? That is discouraging! Will the anchors dissolve? It doesn't seem like they would.
    I'm guessing that taking it easy is probably the best route to a full recovery.
    I think I further injured myself this weekend. I missed a stairstep and landed on my bad leg. Now I have a sharp pain with sitting. I really just want to get this surgery over with.
    My doctor had told me before surgery that there wasn't much I could do to make the hamstring tears worse So, there was that.

    It's probably n=1 for the most part. But, for me, sitting is still extremely uncomfortable. Lounging on a couch is ok, but everything else is painful after about 3-5 minutes. I move around a lot when I'm sitting if I can.

    I honestly have no idea if I have absorbable/dissolvable anchors or not. I keep forgetting to ask. Either it's slightly improving or I'm getting used to the discomfort, though. It has improved, just slowly!

  6. #2556
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    Sep 2012
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    My apologies in advance, for the length of my comments...

    I was told by my doctor that the anchors were absorbable/dissolving, but there are different kinds. Certainly worth asking your doc, and I have no idea how quickly they actually dissolve.

    I have a vertical (up/down) incision. I wouldn't have thought of it before, but I wonder if this lends to the difference in pain when sitting, particularly on a saddle? Maybe because there's not as large a cross section/contact point of scar tissue?? I dunno...

    I would guess that the new pain experienced by Jenner is from pulling/straining your glute muscle. Your body compensates so quickly and engages other muscles to support/stabilize your leg, you may well have pulled your glute muscle (since that is what hurts more when sitting now) when stepping off the stairs. I damaged my glute at the time of my injury as well. Wish it didn't have to, but your glute (or other injured muscles) will have time to heal while your recovering from the surgery. I will also add that you really have to be careful during recovery too. After getting my brace off and being able to sleep on my back, I made the mistake of "clenching" my butt muscle while laying on my back, trying to change my position, and my glute was so weak on the injured side that it immediately cramped and hurt a lot. It scared the heck out of me... thought I might have pulled the new attachment off! Thankfully, I did not. Without the constant reminder of crutches, I've mistakenly done some other really dumb things, like going up stairs or "lunging" after my 3 year old when she started to run away with something she shouldn't have. Twice I have stepped up one step of stairs on my injured leg before catching myself and going up one step at a time with my good leg only. Nothing really bad has happened as the result of these (as far as I know now), but from what I've read, I do think we need to be very vigilante in protecting the healing tendon-to-bone connection for the first 6-8 weeks. PT exercises that start before then are great for blood flow , prevention of scar tissue formation, and minimizing atrophy of supporting muscles, but it sounds like up to 8 weeks to get really good results for reattachment. I might just carry a crutch around as a reminder for the next two weeks

    I have another question/observation: It sounds like more than a few of us are cyclists and/or multi-sport athletes. For about 3 months prior to my injury, I had been struggling with upper hamstring tendonopathy. From what I've read about it, as a "repetitive use" injury, it is not an uncommon condition for runners, cyclists, and/or triathletes. I'm pretty convinced that my avulsion happened as a result of the tendon being already weakened, and that I had stupidly ignored my body's warning signs when I chose to go water skiing. Did any of you also have a pre-existing condition like tendonopathy of that tendon?

    One more note, you've all probably done the searches and seen some of these, but just for extra info, here are some links to rehabilitation guidelines from Ohio State University and University of Wisconsin. It's interesting to see some of the variation in their outlined rehab progression. The protocol my doctor gave is slightly more "conservative" than either of these, but it sounds like a few of you are following significantly more conservative progression timelines. I am not, in anyway, advocating that you deviate from what your doctor outlines for you, but it I thought it was interesting to see some differences in approach to rehab. Lot's of room for individual differences.
    https://ckm.osu.edu/sitetool/sites/s...tocol_2010.pdf
    http://www.uwhealth.org/files/uwheal...g_protocol.pdf

  7. #2557

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinBikes16 View Post
    I have another question/observation: It sounds like more than a few of us are cyclists and/or multi-sport athletes. For about 3 months prior to my injury, I had been struggling with upper hamstring tendonopathy. From what I've read about it, as a "repetitive use" injury, it is not an uncommon condition for runners, cyclists, and/or triathletes. I'm pretty convinced that my avulsion happened as a result of the tendon being already weakened, and that I had stupidly ignored my body's warning signs when I chose to go water skiing. Did any of you also have a pre-existing condition like tendonopathy of that tendon?

    One more note, you've all probably done the searches and seen some of these, but just for extra info, here are some links to rehabilitation guidelines from Ohio State University and University of Wisconsin. It's interesting to see some of the variation in their outlined rehab progression. The protocol my doctor gave is slightly more "conservative" than either of these, but it sounds like a few of you are following significantly more conservative progression timelines.
    Mine I don't think was due to anything other than a traumatic crash. Saddle got kicked up into me (it all happened so fast I honestly am not sure, conjecture at this point; I was over redlined after a climb, going faster than I should've been descending when it occurred) bucked me a bit, and as much as I can tell, I was trying to kick up and over the bars in an endo, but wound up hyper-extending the knee and then hip angle and bam, hamstring pulled right off. I'd never felt anything like it before. My right heel slammed into the dirt taking full impact immediately after. Left hamstring felt like the worst cramp I've ever experienced, x5. I caught my breath, had someone straighten my bars, and I tried 3 times over probably 10 or so minutes to get back up, and could not stand on my own.

    I think my surgeon was fairly conservative, but my rehab has come almost strictly from PT. Doctors said around week 3-4 I could walk in a pool, and then my two PT RX's have been "advance stretching and move to full weight-bearing" and then "advance strengthening. No Ballistic activities."

    VERY sore after sitting at my desk for 6 hours yesterday (I did take a lunch to go to the gym for upper body stuff), and then PT. Got to do total gym "squats" about 50% body weight (though it didn't feel that way, felt easier) plus step ups and wall sits. Weighted prone exercises. PT noted that she is stretching the hamstring in leg straight (e.g. I'm lying on my back, leg is straight, and she stretches the leg up toward 60 degrees or so?) I've doubled what feels okay in 2 weeks. Progress has been nice. Just wish I could SIT!

  8. #2558
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Thanks to both of you for your detailed responses! I am still at work today and tomorrow, so I will probably be more prolific when I have more down time. I am not sure what I did the other night when I missed the patio step. When I first went to the doctor after the MRI, he indicated that while the tendons were avulsed, the sheath was intact. I think that that might no longer be the case, because the pain is not in my glute but right at my sit bones.
    Also, before my waterskiing mishap, I had been training pretty hard for a triathlon (which I had to miss), and I think my hamstrings were tight to begin with. Not sure about tendonopathy, but I guess it is possible. I will check out the links MarinBikes posted as well.
    -sounds like quite a dramatic/traumatic crash, AWord4you!
    Good luck to you both!

  9. #2559

    Default 5 months post surgery: 5k etc

    Hi all. Great reading the posts. I'm over 5 months post surgery and recovering well for a 55 year old weekend warrior. I managed a 5k last month which was about 30-45 seconds per mile off my pre injury pace, but I am improving. I'm doing the aqua bike portion of an oly tri tomorrow and planning a century ride at the end of the month. Peak speed, strenth and endurance are slow coming back, but they are coming. I did fairly conventional PT for three months then got cleared to focus on more of a "crossfit endurance" style program and more swimming than normal for me. My PT was a certified crossfit level 1 as well as weight lifting instructor so he started me off right--focussing on form not weight, using blocks, basics. I hated it, but glad I went slow and moved correctly. I also used a chiro, an ART specialist and massage to help with the "collateral damage" from six week in a full leg brace. Tip: save some pain killers for the post pt pain. It was much worse than the post op pain.

    While you cannot rush the lower body strenth exercises, you can have some fun with bench press, pull ups etc. If you are an endurance athlete, it can be a fun change and the early strength gains on 5 x 5 weight lifting programs are a great morale booster. I believe the hormonal release stimulated by heavy lifting promotes healing. Keep the weight high, reps down and you won't bulk up. I won't win my event tomorrow, but four months ago I could barely get on or off the toilet, put my socks on etc., so I'm feeling pretty good. Dont get discouraged. It takes months to rebuild serious strength and endurance, but it will come if you stick to the program.

  10. #2560

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpolaw View Post
    Hi all. Great reading the posts. I'm over 5 months post surgery and recovering well for a 55 year old weekend warrior. I managed a 5k last month which was about 30-45 seconds per mile off my pre injury pace, but I am improving. I'm doing the aqua bike portion of an oly tri tomorrow and planning a century ride at the end of the month. Peak speed, strenth and endurance are slow coming back, but they are coming. I did fairly conventional PT for three months then got cleared to focus on more of a "crossfit endurance" style program and more swimming than normal for me. My PT was a certified crossfit level 1 as well as weight lifting instructor so he started me off right--focussing on form not weight, using blocks, basics. I hated it, but glad I went slow and moved correctly. I also used a chiro, an ART specialist and massage to help with the "collateral damage" from six week in a full leg brace. Tip: save some pain killers for the post pt pain. It was much worse than the post op pain.

    While you cannot rush the lower body strenth exercises, you can have some fun with bench press, pull ups etc. If you are an endurance athlete, it can be a fun change and the early strength gains on 5 x 5 weight lifting programs are a great morale booster. I believe the hormonal release stimulated by heavy lifting promotes healing. Keep the weight high, reps down and you won't bulk up. I won't win my event tomorrow, but four months ago I could barely get on or off the toilet, put my socks on etc., so I'm feeling pretty good. Dont get discouraged. It takes months to rebuild serious strength and endurance, but it will come if you stick to the program.
    I'm SO excited to hear that you've been incorporating crossfit-type workouts into your recovery. I'm going on 18wks out and struggling w/my run...slow (so slow) and different aches/pains after. I'm also trying to be patient and listen to my body. My surgeon is a professional colleague and has kept a close eye on me as I'm not known to be patient w/myself. But.....

    I've been itching to take up crossfit to attempt to recover and build more functional strength. I've been fit for many years (military, run, lift, yoga, cycle, etc) but as I get older I recognize the more I do to prevent injury, the better I will be.

    Anyway I'm encouraged to know you've felt good about crossfit and I've found a gym here that will push me (provided I'm safe and patient). I've been spinning, jogging, walking, yoga, lifting (mostly upper body) and now I'll pursue more variety

 

 

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